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David, Editor Nato War Games

“The stories have really brought worldly conflicts to the table and have shown the disparities of diverse human views”, 22-year old Steffi from the Phillipines told the Guardian newspaper. What she says is mirrored across the spectrum for millennials.

You’d be forgiven for thinking Steffi is talking about the current affairs of North Korea’s Nuclear intentions, Orbán’s endgame with the EU or the global pandemic but, no. She’s referring to the world’s most profitable movie Marvel’s Avengers Endgame.

“Why is it young people will watch fictional cinema of an event but they won’t bother with the same one in news?”…


We watch the scene in Interstellar. Great film. You know the one. This below. Welcome to Emerging Journalism or what others call the Future Story Lab. We figure this is a rare programme bridging storytellers, tech-data peops, entrepreneurs in the same space, in a university working with industry.

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That scene! What about “the world doesn’t need more traditional journalists?” It’s a rhetorical question. Perhaps not! But we could we do with a multi-hyphenated form of storyteller? PCW tell us what the in-demand skills are in the 2020s. Creativity, leadership, solving problems…that’s what’s needed. Then tell that compelling story.


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Clive Myrie by David McIlveen

It looks like a scene from No Country for Old Men, the Coen brothers’ adaptation of Cormac McCarthy’s stark darkly- evil plot. This is a forgotten place, the southern borders of the US where the land is cleaved by a wall between two countries. Hope is what people cling onto literally breaching the walls as others look to thwart them.

On BBC Television news viewers will watch the dramas unfold. Some eight months later the scenes will be amongst iconic ones trailing the Royal Television Society (RTS) Awards — think of it as the Oscars for television journalism in the…


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Photo by Sitbonzo David Berman

Look around you. It’s more than likely whatever field you work in you can point to someone who’s the avant-garde, an outlier, an artist at their craft whom you and a few others admire. They are the visionaries whose work unbeknown to many, only in hindsight, signalled the future.

Television producer and art critic Robert Hughes sought to frame the work of this artist by saying “The essence of the avant-garde myth is that the artist is a precursor; the truly significant work of art is the one that prepares the future”.

They somehow see the future, yet for Hughes…


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Photo by Ken Mellor

Are you kidding me? Cue: howls of belly-ache laughter followed by the sort of ribbing you could do without. It’s the 70s and ITN journalist John Suchet is decked out as a one-man band.

The image was in fact spoofed by his sound man Ken Mellor and sent to broadcast union heads with the note John was breaking the rules by attempting to report, shoot and do sound at the same time. Back then not only was it forbidden by the unions, it appeared nigh on impossible. ITN journalists were however visionaries in more union-accepted ways. …


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Question: Quickly name a piece of media that’s memorable. Done!
What are the chances it’s a piece of journalism news? Rare. Unless it’s epic.

It’s not unusual for TV executives to talk about television news storytelling and apologise for the use of the word ‘cinema’ or cinematic’ in describing a scene that leaps out of the screen. Happens quite a lot.

The apology tends to signify the presence of a highly visual aesthetic e.g. shallow focus, which is associated with, not TV, but cinema feature films.

From my interviews with execs there is an awkwardness. Television execs cite cinema emphatic…


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‘Incompetent’ was the invisible sign stamped on my forehead. I spoke to an old acquaintance from one of the tech giants this week who was looking at how to improve diversity in media and I was reminded of this personal story.

I got my first freelance reporting gig on national radio, e.g. BBC Radio 5 in the early 90s. I noticed something quickly. There were three tiers that generally behaved in a distinct way to me and other journos who were black or brown. There were the producers, about my age; then senior producers and then heads.

When I was…


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Dr. David Dunkley Gyimah (photo, Kienda Hoji)

‘Remote learning conundrum in academia’ — it sounds like a CNN headline with a swirling whoosh. A multi-billion pound industry is being tested in the face of a lockdown.

Meetings across faculties, like Matryoshka dolls, follow one after another. Zoom, few were familiar with months earlier, becomes an international household name, whilst a new word surfaces, ‘Zoom zonked’ ie fatigue.

It’s going to be tough, undeniably, in delivering lockdown lectures and yet, and yet, a solution has been visible in plain site. …


I still find it unfathomable that public facing institutions or ones that operate across cultural boundaries avoid canvassing or showing a diversity of thought amongst a cultural heterogenous group.

‘Now I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds’ , the Father of the Atomic bomb’ J. Robert Oppenheimer said. It was a mistranslation according to Rev Dr Stephen Thompson. World-destroying time = death in Sanskrit. Not withstanding this, this new energy-technology Oppenheimer could now see had an apocalyptic dark side.

Any optimism of a new wondrous technology requires a tempering particularly when in the hands of private companies whose profits…


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It’s not unusual for TV executives to talk about television news storytelling and apologise for the use of the word ‘cinema’ or cinematic’ in describing a scene that leaps out of the screen.

The apology tends to signify the presence of a highly visual aesthetic e.g. shallow focus, which is associated with, not TV, but cinema feature films.

From my interviews with execs there is an awkwardness. Television execs citing cinema when they’re two different media: primarily one is truth and fact and the other is fiction, means at the very least it’s best to use the term sparingly.

I’m…

Dr. David Dunkley Gyimah

Top Writer & Creative Technologist, Int. Award Winner. Cinemajournalist. Cardiff Uni @jomec. PhD (Dublin). Visiting Prof UBC, Ex BBC/C4News. Apple profiled.

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