Great ideas take time and that should be appreciated. Agree?

10 seconds to guess all of the above whether you’ve been in contact with them. Answers at the bottom of this post.

Communication artefacts of yesteryear, linking the past and the present.

Their obsolescence is in part the continued collapse in time, patience and attention. Give it a name to capture the essence; the tik tok era. Tik Tok what can take seconds seems infinitely inviting than spending minutes, hours, days and so on. That’s the allure of technology, but also the rub with the human condition.

Today, the Net, this platform is replete with authors offering short cuts to achieving aims and executing ideas. I’m just as guilty, but as a university lecturer specialising in innovation, its history and impact and taking the long view, time is becoming an issue.

In 2030 I imagine they’ll be courses on the appreciation and respect of this abstract thing, “Time”. The issue didn’t start this side slightly south of the millennia. Human nature has invariably gravitated to minimum resistance — heuristics.

Now it’s becoming hyper. Where do good ideas come from, asks Steve Johnson in a highly enjoyable read. Well in those seven patterns he offers time — the slow hunch, as one of them.

Great ideas take time, but new technology is pricing out patience.

Time and effort have always been the challenge to human endeavour. But in the 21st century they’re irritants. If you haven’t got to this point of my text, it could be that it’s ill-suited to you, and perhaps you’ve just not given it the benefit of the doubt. Oh and in case you’re thinking of offering an alternative view, yep this post could just be rubbish.

I love this piece of work by Adam Westbrook. Da Vinci was a loser, he says. Yep the guy deified by historians was actually in our generational thinking a loser.

Now, if you liked that, you’ve got to give yourself some more time to watch the second because that seals the idea of time and genius. For instance novelist Stephen King wrote every day for nine years before his big break, says Adam in The Long Game Part 2: the missing chapter

If this type of storytelling appeals to you and you’d love to make them, guess what? They take time. Here’s Adam whom I’ve known for a while and seen him grow his fantastic career explaining.

Online and @Medium posts headlines boast shortcuts and formulas. Many might work. It’s helped people create careers. But equally rewarding is the experiment and patience of discovery, the flaneurism of it all.

We’re about to launch our Storylab hub where we train cohorts in building startups and mastering its storytelling. It takes time, I tell our Masters students and failing is a necessary part of the discovery.

In a post soon, I’m going to feature CNN’s Max Foster. Max is one of the most watched journalists on Tik Tok and in the last two years has been experimenting and is about to transfer his new Tik Tok knowledge to his new CNN show.

No doubt there are several experts who might be able to provide a list of the ten things you need to do to build a Tik Tok audience. But Max has the feel of the cloth and that great ideas take time — and that should be appreciated. Agree?

Credit — -Darren-Bull

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Top Writer & Creative Technologist, Int. Award Winner. Cinemajournalist. Cardiff Uni @jomec. PhD (Dublin). Visiting Prof UBC, Ex BBC/C4News. Apple profiled.

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Dr. David Dunkley Gyimah

Dr. David Dunkley Gyimah

Top Writer & Creative Technologist, Int. Award Winner. Cinemajournalist. Cardiff Uni @jomec. PhD (Dublin). Visiting Prof UBC, Ex BBC/C4News. Apple profiled.

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